JDRF


JDRF is the leading global organization funding T1D research.
 
Millions of people around the world live with type 1 diabetes (T1D), a life-threatening autoimmune disease that strikes both children and adults. There is no way to prevent it, and at present, no cure. JDRF works every day to change this by amassing grassroots support, deep scientific knowledge and strong industry and academic partnerships to fund research.
 
JDRF funds research that transforms the lives of people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). We want a cure, and we won’t stop until we find one. Along the way, we will continue to drive scientific progress that delivers new treatments and therapies that make day-to-day life with T1D easier, safer and healthier.
 

 

Our commitment to you

 
If you live with T1D, you spend a lot of time thinking about your blood-sugar levels now and worrying about the complications that T1D may one day bring. You don’t want anyone else you love to ever know the physical, emotional and financial toll this disease takes. You want a cure.
 
So does JDRF. And we are committed to funding the development of new therapies and treatments to keep people with T1D healthier, longer, until that cure is found. That’s why we invest in multiple therapeutic approaches to cure, prevent and treat T1D. We identify and invest in promising therapies in their early stages, helping researchers pursue innovative ideas and approaches. This investment strategy ensures that the most life-changing breakthroughs can make it through the long research, development and delivery process and get to people living with T1D sooner.
 
We know it won’t be easy. It will take time and require a significant financial investment. But we want it all: a biological cure for T1D, transformational treatments that improve lives now and prevention so that future generations never know T1D. JDRF is turning Type One into Type None.
 

 

Contact Us:

JDRF International Office
26 Broadway, 14th floor
New York, NY 10004
800-533-CURE (2873)
info@jdrf.org
 

 


JDRF Research

 
Our Glucose Control and Artificial Pancreas Programs tackle blood-glucose control head on. Managing insulin alone won’t achieve perfect control. So we’re investigating how managing other hormones or repurposing drugs approved for other uses can work with insulin to improve control. Artificial pancreas technology will improve control by automating blood-glucose sensing and insulin delivery. Tighter control reduces complications and eliminates the need to think about blood-sugar levels, insulin dosing and carbohydrate counting.
 
Beta cell encapsulation therapy holds the promise of eliminating the need for daily insulin treatment for up to 24 months through a small implant. The researchers and partners we support through our Beta Cell Replacement Program are testing multiple efforts to perfect cell replacement therapies, including the development of materials to protect the cells and discovery of new replacement cell sources. We think for people with T1D who are on duty all day every day just to stay alive, encapsulation will sure feel like a cure.
 
We refuse to accept the idea that people with T1D must live in fear of life-threatening diabetic complications. Our Complications Program seeks to better understand how diabetic kidney and eye diseases start so we can stop them in their tracks. Of course, the best way to ward off complications is to protect people from the disease entirely.
 
Our Prevention Program’s primary goal is to develop a universal childhood vaccine that prevents the autoimmune attack on insulin-producing cells. As we work toward that goal, we’re also pursuing secondary prevention therapies that will prevent people from becoming dependent on insulin therapy once T1D is diagnosed.
 
Our Restoration Program is attempting to do something that has never been done before—prevent, halt or reverse an autoimmune disease and return normal function of the beta cells.
 

Early Symptoms of Diabetes

 
Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for:
 
  • If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst.
  • Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin.
  • If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat.
  • High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes.
  • Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose.
 
Other signs of diabetes
 
Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes.

What Is It Like to Have T1D?

 
 
Ask people who have T1D, and they will tell you: it’s difficult. It’s upsetting. It’s life threatening. It never goes away. But at the same time, people with T1D serve as an inspiration by facing the disease’s challenges with courage and perseverance, and they don’t let it stand in the way of achieving their goals.
 
“Both children and adults like me who live with type 1 diabetes need to be mathematicians, physicians, personal trainers, and dietitians all rolled into one. We need to be constantly factoring and adjusting, making frequent finger sticks to check blood sugars, and giving ourselves multiple daily insulin injections just to stay alive.”
— JDRF International Chairman, Mary Tyler Moore
 
“It is a 24/7/365 job. We never get to relax and forget about food, whether we’ve exercised too much or too little, insulin injections, blood-sugar testing, or the impact of stress, a cold, a sunburn, and on and on. So many things make each day a risky venture when you live with T1D.”
— Mary Vonnegut, adult, Rhode Island
 
“Unlike other kids, I have to check my blood sugar 8 to 10 times a day; everything I eat is measured and every carbohydrate counted. My kit goes with me everywhere I go … Too much exercise or not eating all my food can be dangerous. I think I’m too young to have to worry about all this stuff.”
— Jonathan Platt, 8, California
 
“It controls your life in ways that someone without it doesn’t even see. For me, the worst part of living with T1D is the fear that my three children or their children might develop the disease.”
— Nicky Hider, adult, New York