CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


About

For over 60 years, CDC has been dedicated to protecting health and promoting quality of life through the prevention and control of disease, injury, and disability. We are committed to programs that reduce the health and economic consequences of the leading causes of death and disability, thereby ensuring a long, productive, healthy life for all people.

Contact Information

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)
 
For more information, visit www.cdc.gov
 

 


CDC's Mission & Role

Mission
CDC works 24/7 to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the U.S. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack, CDC fights disease and supports communities and citizens to do the same.
 
CDC increases the health security of our nation. As the nation’s health protection agency, CDC saves lives and protects people from health threats. To accomplish our mission, CDC conducts critical science and provides health information that protects our nation against expensive and dangerous health threats, and responds when these arise.
 
Role
  • CDC 24-7 logoTaking the health pulse of our nation
  • Detecting and responding to new and emerging health threats
  • Tackling the biggest health problems causing death and disability for Americans
  • Putting science and advanced technology into action to prevent disease
  • Promoting healthy and safe behaviors, communities and environment
  • Developing leaders and training the public health workforce, including disease detectives

 

 


Take 3 Actions to Fight Flu

1. Take to get a flu vaccine
  • CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses.
  • Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine as soon as the current season's vaccines are available.
2. Take Every day Healthy Habits
  • Try and avoid close contact to those with flu
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
3. Take Antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them
  • If you get the flu, antiviral drugs can treat your illness
 

 


Flu: Groups at Risk

Most people who get the flu will have mild illness, will not need medical care or antiviral drugs, and will recover in less than two weeks. Some people, however, are more likely to get flu complications that result in being hospitalized and occasionally result in death.

Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections are examples of flu-related complications. The flu also can make chronic health problems worse.

For example, people with asthma may experience asthma attacks while they have the flu, and people with chronic congestive heart failure may have worsening of this condition that is triggered by the flu.

The list below includes some of the groups of people more likely to get flu-related complications if they get sick from influenza.
People who have medical conditions including:
  • Asthma
  • Neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions [including disorders of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve, and muscle such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy (seizure disorders), stroke, intellectual disability (mental retardation), moderate to severe developmental delay, muscular dystrophy, or spinal cord injury].
  • Chronic lung disease (such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] and cystic fibrosis)
  • Heart disease (such as congenital heart disease, congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease)
  • Blood disorders (such as sickle cell disease)
  • Endocrine disorders (such as diabetes mellitus)
  • Kidney disorders